Typical Spanish tiles from Seville

Seeing the Best of Seville in a Day

Staying in a villa on the Costa del Sol offers the perfect opportunity to see the best of the Andalucian cities like Seville and Granada, as they can easily be reached in a day.

Thanks to the excellent Andalucia road network it’s perfectly possible to spend a day in Seville while staying on the coast.  To get the most out of your trip you will want to know the best things to do, so here are five must-sees for visiting Seville in a day.

Our Top Tips For a Day in Seville

Seville is the quintessential Andalusian city where fine monuments, haunting flamenco and fragrant orange blossom come together to make it one of Spain’s most romantic cities. The capital of Andalucia and home to the regional government, Seville is a bustling metropolis with a long list of cultural and leisure attractions.

Divided by the winding Guadalquivir River, Seville has a skyline is dominated by the Moorish Giralda tower (the city’s symbol) and the ultra-modern Pelli Tower (Andalusia’s tallest building). Seville is somewhere to take your time over as you soak up the atmosphere in the Santa Cruz and Triana districts, stroll along the river or explore the Arenal, home to the world’s most famous bullring La Maestranza.

It’s worth dedicating a couple of days to this lively city if you can, and we would be happy to assist with arranging “A Spoily Sleepover” in the city with our private guides. But if you only have a day to spend in the city, here are five unmissable things to do in Seville.

Alcšzar

This Moorish-style palace is Seville’s answer to the Alhambra in Granada. The fine rooms and patios were commissioned by Pedro I, the Christian king who reigned in this part of Andalusian during the 14th century. The craftsmanship is on a par with the Alhambra since the building was done by Moorish workers based in Granada. Admire the delicate stucco and decorative tiling throughout as well as the characteristic keyhole arches and courtyards.

Highlights in the Mudejar masterpiece – still used by the Spanish royal family as a residence – include the intricate Patio de las Doncellas, sumptuous Sala de los Embajadores where ambassadors were received and the antique and tapestry-packed Royal Chambers. The gardens are a treat for the senses with bougainvillea, orange blossom and fountains at every turn.

Cathedral

Visit Seville in a day

The Iconic Giralda Tower in Seville

Everything about Seville’s Cathedral is big -it’s the largest in Spain and the third largest in the world. Started in the early 15th century, it’s also the world’s largest Gothic building. This giant ochre structure was built on top of the Moorish mosque, completely demolished except for the minaret.

Inside this vast place of worship, admire the main chapel whose altarpiece is the largest in the world, the monument to Christopher Columbus (it contains some of his remains – the whereabouts of the others is much debated), the Royal Chapel with the tombs of several monarchs and the Orange Tree Patio whose central fountains were originally used for ablutions by worshippers at the mosque.

Next, climb the minaret, the original 12th Moorish tower with its later additions of 24 bells and the weather vane in the form of a bronze statue of Faith. Known as the Giraldillo (small turning object), the vane gave its name to the Giralda Tower, the city’s most famous landmark. The ascent to the top is unusually via ramps, built to allow soldiers on horseback to climb the tower. The panoramic views of Seville are well worth the climb and give you a good idea of the city’s layout.

Santa Cruz

This corner of the city is a maze of alleyways, squares and whitewashed houses. Lose yourself as you wander round the narrow streets, pausing to admire the typically Andalusian wrought-iron grills and flower-filled balconies, dip into the curio-packed antique shops or enjoy a fino sherry and tapa at one of the outdoor cafés.

If you have time, visit the Casa de Pilatos (so-called because the 16th mansion is supposedly modelled on Pontius Pilate’s house in Jerusalem) with its exceptional Andalusian tiles, Renaissance architecture and lovely patio.

Santa Cruz is also home to a must for flamenco fans – the Flamenco Museum where displays explain the background and art behind Spain’s best-known music. Shows and classes are also held here.

Parque de Maria Luisa

This lovely park brings some welcome respite from Seville’s hustle and bustle. If you don’t fancy exploring the park on foot, hire a horse and carriage to take you round. Small cafés provide perfect stops for refreshment.

The park, a mixture of formal gardens and parkland, was redesigned for the 1929 World Fair (Seville also hosted the event in 1992) and houses several pavilions including the magnificent Plaza de España. Here, each of Spain’s provinces is represented in a tiled mosaic and you can hire a rowing boat to sail along the small canal.

Hotel Alfonso XIII

Hotels reach a new dimension at this emblematic venue, built also for the 1929 World Fair in the Mudejar style. Walk through the doors and you leave the busy city behind and enter a slice of history, but, although the essence is traditional, a recent head-to-toe renovation means all mod cons are available too. The central glass and brick courtyard is perhaps the architectural highlight and perfect for enjoying a leisurely cocktail after a day’s sightseeing.

Visit the Hotel Alfonso XIII on a day in Seville

The Hotel Alfonso XIII is a highlight in Seville

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  1. […] Seville is a much larger city than Jerez, there are, unsurprisingly, many more Flamenco bars and peñas to […]

  2. […] Seville is a much larger city than Jerez, there are, unsurprisingly, many more Flamenco bars and peñas to […]

  3. […] a daytrip to Seville, too? Have a read of our post on ‘Seeing the Best of Seville in a Day‘ to get some […]

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